The OF Blog: For the (very) few curious about the non-English grammars and dictionaries I have

Thursday, February 25, 2010

For the (very) few curious about the non-English grammars and dictionaries I have

 
Here are pictures of most of  the non-English grammars and dictionaries I have acquired over the years (at work, I have two more Attic/Koine Greek grammars, another Romanian one, along with multiple German, French, and Italian textbooks).  Some of these originally were for students I taught in Florida almost a decade ago, while a couple of others are college textbooks of mine.





For some of these, I have no literature in those languages, but most of these I do have fiction and non-fiction published in these languages that I do want to learn, if I haven't already in some form.  And yes, that's a Quechua book up there.  One day, one day...



 
Right now, most of my language focus is on Attic Greek, but I constantly read works in Spanish and occasionally will use my two dictionaries (bilingual, defining) to help me with translations back and forth between English and Spanish.  Will likely next return to studying Serbian, now that I have a proper textbook and a rudimentary dictionary.  Many reasons I have for wanting to learn that language, not least was learning what veverica was...

6 comments:

Jen said...

So, what's a veverica? Is is squirrel? If so, I found out where we got the word :P

José said...

If it's the same as in Romanian (but spellt veveriţa) then it is a squirrel.

Larry said...

Yes, it's squirrel. Lovely word for a lovely, vicious creature, no? :D

Jen said...

It's always funny when I find that a language that doesn't have anything in common with mine... actually does have something in Romanian :D

Larry said...

Maybe because Romanians have been nearly surrounded by Slavs and Magyars for so long that a few of their words rubbed off onto y'all? :P There are several Native American languages that have influenced American English, and to a lesser extent, UK English. Gotta love linguistic diffusion, no? :D

Oh, and that regardless of the language, just saying the word for "squirrel" rules! :P

Jen said...

I've always known that we have a lot of Slavic words... but actually realizing what they are is always entertaining. When I went to Ukraine I was constantly going "ooh, that's the same! ooh, that too!". Easily amused, yeah...

 
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